Horse and Circus Brasses: Horse-brasses

//Horse and Circus Brasses: Horse-brasses

Horse and Circus Brasses: Horse-brasses

  • Perhaps never again will such a presentation of rare stamps and coins be assembled for the lover of English football; the sport that has become a tradition and source of national pride. The British studio that produces our coin sets is a leader in the field of nostalgic, commemorative and souvenir coin gifts. Using genuine pre-decimal coins, stamps and bank notes no longer in circulation, they produce the ideal British souvenir and original gift ideas. This Limited Edition collection of 1000  will not be offered after our inventory is depleated and will become a classic, providing a lasting a pride of ownership. It includes scarce original stamps and coins minted between 1900 and 1999, including the famous World Cup Winners stamp issued by the Royal Mint in 1966. This collection connects with famous footballers and football events and includes the Football Legends set of Royal Mail stamps. This prized collection is set in a beautiful black ash wood frame measuring approximately 18" X 13 1/4." and comes with a numbered certificate of authenticity. We have only nine left in our inventory.
  • A gold Gaelic harp with silver strings on a blue background has been Ireland's heraldic emblem since the 13th century. It is sometimes referred to as the harp of Brian Boru, High king of Ireland (who died about 400 years before it was made), also as the Trinity College harp, the oldest surviving Irish harp (late 14th century). The harp was selected as the state emblem on the establishment of the Free Irish State and was incorporated into the Great Seal of the Irish Free state. It continued to be the state emblem after the Constitution of Ireland was adopted and its image is used on coins, passports, official documents of the state, the official seals of the President and ministers of government. It now appears on the Royal Coat of Arms of the united Kingdom since the union of the crowns of Ireland, England to that of Scotland by James VI of Scotland in March 1603.
  • This military unit was raised originally in response to the Jacobite Rebellion in 1715 as Humphrey Gore's Regiment of Dragoons. Renamed 10th Royal Hussars, Prince Of Wales Own, in 1751 and in 1806, The Royal Hussars. "Dragoon" comes from the word "Dragon" and was used in the name as these were among the first cavalry regiments to use rifles rather than swords when entering the fight on horseback. They laid the rifle between the ears of their horse when galloping toward their enemy at full speed. The purpose was to create chaos in the ranks of the enemy, making it easier for the advancing foot soldiers to destroy their adversaries with minimal loss to their own warriors.
  • Born at Kensington Palace on May 24, 1819. Crowned at Westminster Abbey on June 28, 1838. Died at Osbourne House, Isl. of Wight on January 22, 1901 at the age of 81. Queen Victoria became Queen at the age of 18 and reigned for nearly 64 years, longer than any other sovereign in the history of England (1839-1901.) In 1839 she fell in love with her cousin, Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, and married him in spite of both Parliament's objections and the people of London who saw him as a bit "stuffy" and viewed by many as an impoverished German princeling on the "make." Victoria believed as Queen she could do as she pleased, genuinely loved her handsome and talented cousin and the wedding took place on February 10, 1840, at St. James Palace. They had 9 children. Prince Albert was an excellent choice for both the young Queen and Britain as he played a crucial active role in guiding Queen Victoria who had to learn to adapt her personality and private convictions to her new public role as sovereign of the British Empire during an age when Britain changed almost beyond recognition. After his death in 1861, she became so distraught that she went into seclusion and had to be coaxed back into public life by her Prime Minister in order to save the throne which had become disengaged from the people. Truly a marriage and partnership arranged in Heaven. When she died the nation went into deep mourning at the loss of a much loved monarch.
  • The name "Dragoon" comes from "Dragon" which was the nickname for a musket. The cavalry traditionally used swords in combat, but the dragoons were the first to introduce the musket which was leveled between the ears of the horse. This unit was raised in 1688 under the title of "Earl of Devonshire's Regiment of Horse," as all military units before the formation of a national army were named after the individual who recruited them from his own resources and led them into battle as a private army. The Colours (Standard/Flag) is 2' 6" square and includes the Coat of Arms of General Ligonier on one side and on the other, his crest and the motto "Quo Fata Vocant. The Standard narrowly escaped being captured during the battle of Dettingen (1743) when Cornet (rank changed to 2nd Lieutenant in 1871) Richardson, surrounded by the enemy and suffering from more than 30 wounds, held onto the the Colours at swords length until he and the flag could be rescued by reinforcements. The Flag remains unchanged today in his honour. The 4th and 7th were formed originally as mounted infantry. This meant they rode horses to the battlefield, but dismounted and fought on foot. They were later "promoted" to light cavalry status, being armed with a musket, sword, and pistol (hand-gonne) and began fighting on horseback. Today, the regiment serves as a Line Cavalry, assigned to the Royal Armoured Corps. The Colonel-in-Chief is HRH Prince of Wales.
  • This fighting unit was raised in 1715 as an individual fighting force during the Jacobite Rebellion;, the revolt of the Stuarts against King George I. They Started out as cavalry units, but in 1816 they were made into a lancer unit following the fine performance of French Lancer Regiments at the Battle of Waterloo. Lances had been found an effective weapon when used against the British by the Poles during battles in Spain. The Duke of Wellington's Army was prepared for hand to hand fighting, but not against the lances that gave the enemy an advantage of reach and again in the Battle of Waterloo where the British lost one third of their strength in just ten minutes due to their opponents use of the lance against the antiquated weaponry used by the British soldiers. The British decided to introduce the lance into their arsenal. These units saw action in India, playing a key role in the siege and fall of Delhi, earning the nickname "The Delhi Spearmen" and twelve Victoria Crosses for their outstanding performance. Both regiments fought in South Africa from 1899-1902 and on the Western Front during WWI, earning a Victoria Cross for "gallantry in action" for saving the guns of the 119 Battery Royal Field Artillery. During WWII Lord Gort wrote "without the Twelfth Lancers only a small part of the Army would have reached Dunkirk." when they covered the withdrawal of the British Expeditionary Forces. They would then be called upon to serve with an armoured division in North Africa and were the first to link up with American units. A detachment of the units was given the task of guarding the Royal Family and members of the Cabinet during WWII. It has since served in Northern Ireland and in Cyprus as part of the United Nations peacekeeping force. On the horse brass, a pair of crossed lances with pennons flying outward are placed with the Prince of Wales's plume and the motto "Ich Dien" (I serve), while on the lower portion of the lances a scroll inscribed IX-XII.
  • Anne Hathaway's childhood was spent in a house in the small village of Shottery, just west of Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire, England. It is actually not a cottage, but a spacious twelve-room farmhouse with several bedrooms and multiple chimneys (each room had its own fireplace.) She married William Shakespeare when he was 18 and she was both pregnant and 26. We were told, during one of our trips to Stratford, that although there was rumor that her father arranged a shotgun wedding to save family face in the community, there is no conclusive proof. It was not uncommon for brides to be older than the groom during the 19th century, as young girls were often needed at home to help care for younger siblings and would not marry until their late twenties. Three children were born to Anne: Susanna (1583) and the twins Hamnet and Judith (1855). Much has not been recorded regarding their married life, leading to speculation that Shakespeare may have developed a disliking for his wife. For most of their married life, William lived in London where he wrote and performed his plays (Globe Theatre), while Anne stayed in Stratford. But London was where the greater audiences were and when Shakespeare retired from the theatre in 1613, he chose to return to his family in Stratford to spend his remaining years.
  • Queen Elizabeth II may consider Windsor Castle her second home, but the Queen Mother always looked forward to her stay at Balmoral, tucked away in Scotland. In the Middle Ages, a Drummond castle stood on this site between Ballater and Braemar, but by 1600 the castle and estate of Balmoral lay within the vast lands of the Earl of Mar. In the 17th and 18th centuries, ownership of Balmoral passed to the Farquharsons of Inverey and then on to the Earl of Fife until in the 1830's when it became the home of Sir Robert Gordon, brother of the Prime Minister, the Earl of Aberdeen. Balmoral is today best known as a royal residence. The favorite of the late Queen Mother and a summer retreat for Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip. Queen Victoria and Prince Albert rented it while looking for a permanent summer home in Scotland in 1848, then bought it for 30,000 pound sterling in 1852...but sold it after realizing it was too small for their needs, replacing it with the palace we see today. It served the Saxe-Coburgs well for the new Balmoral Castle could easily accommodate Victoria's growing family, as well as the entourage on ministers and secretaries needed for the smooth running of the state during the monarch's absence from London (when she was not in her favorite home on the Isle of Wight). Prince Albert liked the area as it was drier than most parts of the Highlands, which appealed to his advancing rheumatism. The rolling hills of Deeside also reminded him of his native homeland of Thuringia. Queen Victoria was taken with the views of Lochnagar to the south west of the castle. She knew Lord Byron's poem 'Dark Lochnagar and had doubtlessly heard Beethovan's arrangement of Byron's romantic hymn to this majestic mountain. It began as a home built in 1390 by Sir William Drummond, while the grounds belonged to King Robert II (1371-1390) who had a hunting lodge nearby. The estate occupies 65,000 acres of land, includes 100 buildings, is presently valued at 160 million pound sterling, and employs about 50 full time staff and 50-100 part time staff to maintain it and look after the animals as it is a full and working estate.
  • Out of stock
    Built by King John in 1204 in a pretty village at the head of the Beaulieu River in Hampshire, England. After the Dissolution of cathedrals, the Abbey fell into ruin with its stone walls being dismantled and used for the construction of coastal forts required by Henry V111. Only the foundation of what was the largest Cistercian abbey of the 13th century remains intact. The cloister has partly survived, along with the 13th century refectory, which has since been converted into a parish church. It's staircase leading to what was the lector's pulpit still stands. Eachof our horse brasses is handmade by a leading British foundry using only a first-run mix of ingot brass rich in copper for depth of colour and durability. It is then hand filed to remove any excess brass left from casting and hand polished to enhance the natural beauty of quality brass. Measurement Approximately 3.75" in diameter. www.
  • The origins of Parliament go back to the 12th century with the Magna Carta when nobles confronted King John, demanding a share in his power. The first Parliament was summoned by King Edward I in 1295. By the fourteenth century, two distinct houses, the House of Commons (involving elected representatives from counties, towns and cities) and the House of Lords (involving nobility who inherit their title and position in Parliament, and clergy) emerged. The Bill of Rights was drawn in 1689, establishing Parliament's authority over the monarch to pass and repeal laws. The 1707 Act of Union between England and Scotland replaced the individual Parliaments of the two nations with a new Parliament of Great Britain. The 1800 Act of Union with Ireland, abolished the Dublin Parliament and Irish Members of Parliament and Lords were represented in the Westminster Parliament building which is located in London, within the City of Westminster, along the Thames River...near Buckingham Palace (the Monarch) and the centre of London (the Prime Minister). On the Southeast corner of the Houses of Parliament stands Big Ben which owes its existence to a fire in 1834 that destroyed most of the building in which Parliament met. A commission was set up to choose a new building design and the winning design, submitted by Charles Barry, included a clock tower. In 1848, the Astronomer Royal, Sir George Airey, and barrister (lawyer) Edmund Denison, who was also an amateur watchmaker, took charge of designing the clock and Edward Dent was given the job of building it. The "Great Clock" went into action in 1859. Although the Clock Tower is often called Big Ben, this is actually the nickname of the bell housed within the Clock Tower..and Big Ben's official name is the "Great Bell." It took a team of sixteen horses to pull the trolley on which the bell was placed, to the tower. No one knows the exact origins of the name "Big Ben" but it is thought that the bell inside the clock was named after Sir Benjamin Hall, a heavy set man and the First Commissioner of Works, who was known in the House of Commons as Big Ben.
  • Brackley Manor is the manor house in Brackley, Northamptonshire, which dates back as a living community to the Iron Age. Brackley's growth and prosperity is founded by its location on the main road from Northampton to Oxford. By the 13th century, it had become a staple town, sending representatives to meetings at Westminster in London. A castle was built for its protection and the town became the site for important meetings between barons and representatives of the King in 1215, the year of the Magna Carta. It is believed parts of the Magna Carta were drafted in the Manor House. Brackley sided with the Roundheads during the Civil War and attacked tired Royalist troops using the manor as a stopping place during their marches between Northampton and Oxford. Locals suddenly acquired horses from slain cavalry units and enjoyed the spoils of battle valued at between 6,000-7,000 British Pound Sterling which would amount to considerably more at todays value. The town was dominated by the Egerton family (the Earl of Ellesmmere and the Duke of Bridgewater) from the 17th century until the Reform Act of 1832. Brackley then lost its two Members of Parliament and its earlier importance, becoming a relatively quiet market town. It eventually lost its historic borough status it held for more than 700 years.
  • The Bronte Parsonage, located in Haworth, Yorkshire, is the English home of the famous Bronte sisters who spent most of their lives here writing their famous novels inspired by their natural surroundings. In 1820, their Irish born father Patrick Bronte, a published author of poetry and fiction, arrived in Haworth with his Cornish born wife Maria and their six children, taking residence in the local parsonage. Their mother, Maria, died of cancer in 1821 and in 1825 a sister died at the age of eleven. Ten year old Elizabeth died one month later. The surviving children remained at home in the parsonage where education played an important role in their life. Their father held a seat at Cambridge University and encouraged his children to read every book that came their way. Both Charlotte and Emily would later become teachers, but writing would remain their passion until their death: Emily at the age of thirty in 1848 (of tuberculosis) and Anne at the age of twenty-nine in Scarborough where she was receiving treatment in 1849. Charlotte died in March 1855, just three weeks before her thirty-ninth birthday. Their father continued living in the parsonage for the next six years being cared for by his son-in-law (husband of Charlotte) until he died at the age of eighty-four in 1861. Each of our brassware is handmade by a leading British foundry using only a first-run ingot brass mix rich in copper for depth of colour and durability. Each is then hand filed to remove any excess brass left from casting and hand polished to enhance the beauty of quality brass. Approximate measurement. 3.75" in diameter.